It’s That Time of the Year Again

It's that time when I scramble to figure out what in the world we're going to do for our school "extras" this year. However, it seems the first week of August is just not the time to figure these things out – most places either want me to have contacted them by June, or they are not ready with their schedules until almost September. As if I would be ready by June or procrastinate as long as September!
I also wonder why so many people who offer these "extras" think that homeschoolers seeking these must just have excess cash to burn. My main area of interest right now is in finding art lessons. Most folks are happy to offer them – for about $14 per hour per child. I've got three kids I'd like to put in art lessons right now. That adds up to $42 per week. Ain't gonna happen.
We were able to find inexpensive ballet lessons at the public school down the street. The girls are still in St. Louis Children's Choirs and they were kind enough to extend another scholarship for us this year, though it wasn't as big as the one they gave us last year. On paper we look better this year because Craig now has a full-time job. I hope I'm not sounding like I'm complaining because I'm really glad he has a job, but we still can't pay $14 per hour per child for art lessons.
Maybe *I* ought to take art lessons and then I can come home and teach what I learned to my kids. Hmmm. That would be four for the price of one. I'm going to have to think about that some more…

6 thoughts on “It’s That Time of the Year Again

  1. Renae says:

    I’ve got two books you can borrow if you’re interested in trying the DIY method:
    *Drawing with Children, by Mona Brookes
    *Encouraging the artist in your child (even if you can’t draw), by Sally Warner

    Like

  2. martha10 says:

    i taught a small art class a couple of years ago from a home school curriculum. it was an interest of mine but i’ve never had much formal art training in my background. i learned a lot. this curriculum included art appreciation and history as well as elements of art and drawing. with the museum so close to you, that would be cool. the book i used was ARTISTIC PURSUITS: THE ELEMENTS OF ART AND COMPOSITION by Brenda Ellis. that is book 1 for grades 4-6. there is an earlier one and others in the series. that book covers american artists and basic elements of art. the next book covers color and i think it was european artists. i like that it wasn’t totally focused on drawing even tho’ you will learn to draw, but looks on art as a whole and tries to develop an appreciation for art. if drawing isn’t the primary area where your child is gifted in art, they can still learn to love it and see it in lots of areas and not be all frustrated b/c they aren’t that great at drawing. my area of art is shown in my quilting and teaching this class helped my quilting a LOT as well as gave me the reasons behind decorating (which i love to do) in my home.
    i taught this class with LOTS of help from DRAWING FOR DUMMIES (a very fun book) by brenda hoddinott and THE JUMBO BOOK OF ART by irene luxbacher. the second book has lots of fun projects to do with kids that illustrate the different elements of art. some are more complex than others in terms of supplies.
    are there no homeschool co-ops in a city as large as st. louis? that is often a good place to get such things as art…and get some pressure off you. or in teaching one group something you are good at, (that part shouldn’t be hard) you can get free classes for your kids. i know they all work differently.
    my guess is that art takes a lot more time than the other classes for prep. time is one of those luxuries you don’t have. i did find that curriculum was pretty simple and straightforward. at the end of the class, we went to st. louis to the art museum. it was very cool and of course, free! we saw many of the pieces of art that we had studied all year. we learned stories of different artists and why they did what they did and of course, a little about american history as well. if the kids found the class even 1/2 as interesting as i did, it was fun. one of the assignments was that they had to spend at least 1/2 an hr. a week (which was a minimum) drawing in their sketch pad. that is the only way people really learn to draw…by doing it. same with musical instruments…practice, practice…practice.
    as the year went on, they didn’t spend the time doing that and their parents (with 2 exceptions) wanted them to be drawing. i told them that if they wouldn’t practice, they wouldn’t learn to draw. i also decided (for other reasons too) that this was a group that i wouldn’t be able to work with over the long haul…i was doing it for free and it got to be more of an aggravation. i didn’t go back for year 2. in a different setting, it would have been a lot of fun. m

    Like

  3. RT says:

    Megan, perhaps there is a talented high school or college student who would be willing to teach your kids. It would be a valuable resume filler for them, and should be very inexpensive on your end. You could call ask a few youth pastors/interns and see if they have any artistically inclined students. I know that many high school seniors need volunteer hours to graduate — perhaps this could count…? Just an idea.

    Like

  4. Renae says:

    I’ve got two books you can borrow if you’re interested in trying the DIY method:
    *Drawing with Children, by Mona Brookes
    *Encouraging the artist in your child (even if you can’t draw), by Sally Warner

    Like

  5. martha10 says:

    i taught a small art class a couple of years ago from a home school curriculum. it was an interest of mine but i’ve never had much formal art training in my background. i learned a lot. this curriculum included art appreciation and history as well as elements of art and drawing. with the museum so close to you, that would be cool. the book i used was ARTISTIC PURSUITS: THE ELEMENTS OF ART AND COMPOSITION by Brenda Ellis. that is book 1 for grades 4-6. there is an earlier one and others in the series. that book covers american artists and basic elements of art. the next book covers color and i think it was european artists. i like that it wasn’t totally focused on drawing even tho’ you will learn to draw, but looks on art as a whole and tries to develop an appreciation for art. if drawing isn’t the primary area where your child is gifted in art, they can still learn to love it and see it in lots of areas and not be all frustrated b/c they aren’t that great at drawing. my area of art is shown in my quilting and teaching this class helped my quilting a LOT as well as gave me the reasons behind decorating (which i love to do) in my home.
    i taught this class with LOTS of help from DRAWING FOR DUMMIES (a very fun book) by brenda hoddinott and THE JUMBO BOOK OF ART by irene luxbacher. the second book has lots of fun projects to do with kids that illustrate the different elements of art. some are more complex than others in terms of supplies.
    are there no homeschool co-ops in a city as large as st. louis? that is often a good place to get such things as art…and get some pressure off you. or in teaching one group something you are good at, (that part shouldn’t be hard) you can get free classes for your kids. i know they all work differently.
    my guess is that art takes a lot more time than the other classes for prep. time is one of those luxuries you don’t have. i did find that curriculum was pretty simple and straightforward. at the end of the class, we went to st. louis to the art museum. it was very cool and of course, free! we saw many of the pieces of art that we had studied all year. we learned stories of different artists and why they did what they did and of course, a little about american history as well. if the kids found the class even 1/2 as interesting as i did, it was fun. one of the assignments was that they had to spend at least 1/2 an hr. a week (which was a minimum) drawing in their sketch pad. that is the only way people really learn to draw…by doing it. same with musical instruments…practice, practice…practice.
    as the year went on, they didn’t spend the time doing that and their parents (with 2 exceptions) wanted them to be drawing. i told them that if they wouldn’t practice, they wouldn’t learn to draw. i also decided (for other reasons too) that this was a group that i wouldn’t be able to work with over the long haul…i was doing it for free and it got to be more of an aggravation. i didn’t go back for year 2. in a different setting, it would have been a lot of fun. m

    Like

  6. RT says:

    Megan, perhaps there is a talented high school or college student who would be willing to teach your kids. It would be a valuable resume filler for them, and should be very inexpensive on your end. You could call ask a few youth pastors/interns and see if they have any artistically inclined students. I know that many high school seniors need volunteer hours to graduate — perhaps this could count…? Just an idea.

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s