When Theology and Homeology Collide

I’m preparing as much of our Sabbath meal for tonight as I can this morning. I chose the southern selection from the A Return to Sunday Dinner, and that selection includes fried chicken, buttermilk biscuits, green beans with smoked bacon, and hominy spoon bread.

Hominy spoon bread?

You have to understand, I’m mostly a self-taught cook and in my decade-plus of self-teaching, hominy spoon bread has never before crossed my menu plan. So, this morning the directions said to use 4 cups of prepared hominy grits. Okay. I’ve never made grits before, so I followed the directions on the back of the container which said 1 serving was equal to 1/4 C. So I made 12 servings (which, yes, technically should have equaled 3 cups, but it seemed like an awful lot of water, so I stopped there).

If you’ve made grits before you probably know where this is going. Apparently the 1/4 C = 1 serving means 1/4 C of unprepared grits = 1 serving, and once cooked, it = a whole lot more than 1/4 C. What this means practically is that I ended up with a LOT more than the 4 C of prepared hominy grits I needed to make the hominy spoon bread. What to do with the remainder of the grits?

I remembered seeing something about cheese grits on the back of the package and just so happened to have a block of Velveeta handy (I don’t normally keep this in my cabinet, so it was like a bonus today). I dumped in some Velveeta and some garlic powder and voila! Instant cheese grits.

Which, of course, I would be the only one to eat. I spent a few minutes eating a small bowl of cheese grits and staring at the large mound of leftover cheese grits in the pan and thought to myself, “Hmmm. I wonder if cheese grits can be saved.” And then I answered myself, “I supposed if they’ve been predestined.”

I may need this week’s Sabbath rest more than I thought…or just a good “theology of grits” class at Covenant.

PS: Anyone know if cheese grits, once prepared, can be stored and reheated with any success at a later time?

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22 thoughts on “When Theology and Homeology Collide

  1. Ed says:

    Hilarious. Welcome to the (semi) south, where grits are a part of life.
    Knowing what you do now, it may shock you to realize that Marcie and I just received no less than three 5-pound bags of yellow grits from my mom. (It seems that western Tennesseans only eat white grits, unless they are instant– and we all know, from My Cousin Vinny, that, “no self-respecting southerner eats instant grits.”)
    I’d say we’re stocked up for the next few months or so.

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  2. Allison says:

    Yes, you can save them. But you can also…
    make a yummy breakfast casserole with them! Basically layer some leftover bread, 1.5 c. milk (add a little Worchestershire sauce and mustard powder for kick), 6 eggs, cooked bacon or sausage (your choice), and cheese grits (prepare all this the night before) in a 9X13 pan, let sit in fridge overnight, and then bake at 350 for about 45min the next morning. We used to do variations on this a lot for Sunday morning breakfasts! All you have to do is cook it. You could probably also google for some breakfast casserole recipes with grits. Enjoy!

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  3. Allison says:

    Yes, you can save them. But you can also…
    make a yummy breakfast casserole with them! Basically layer some leftover bread, 1.5 c. milk (add a little Worchestershire sauce and mustard powder for kick), 6 eggs, cooked bacon or sausage (your choice), and cheese grits (prepare all this the night before) in a 9X13 pan, let sit in fridge overnight, and then bake at 350 for about 45min the next morning. We used to do variations on this a lot for Sunday morning breakfasts! All you have to do is cook it. You could probably also google for some breakfast casserole recipes with grits. Enjoy!

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  4. Megan says:

    Ooooo, perfect. I don’t think they’d get eaten as is by anyone but me, but if I hide them in a breakfast cassrole for tomorrow morning… PERFECT!!
    Thanks so much!

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  5. Megan says:

    Ooooo, perfect. I don’t think they’d get eaten as is by anyone but me, but if I hide them in a breakfast cassrole for tomorrow morning… PERFECT!!
    Thanks so much!

    Like

  6. martha10 says:

    altho’ i’m not a real southerner, i’ve lived in the south frequently, and have never heard the singular form of grits:) they are always grits no matter how few…even if you have to grit your teeth to eat them:)
    that bkfst. casserole sounds good even tho’ i’m not a huge grits lover, but the sliced one didn’t sound like an exciting way to start the day. eating grits like meatloaf. my mind just can’t get around that concept.
    my first intro. to grits was in a high school boarding school–8th grade. silly me. i tho’t it was a bowl of cream of wheat. what a shock. once i learned to eat them the right way–with butter and salt and pepper, they were pretty good. ha! m

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  7. martha10 says:

    altho’ i’m not a real southerner, i’ve lived in the south frequently, and have never heard the singular form of grits:) they are always grits no matter how few…even if you have to grit your teeth to eat them:)
    that bkfst. casserole sounds good even tho’ i’m not a huge grits lover, but the sliced one didn’t sound like an exciting way to start the day. eating grits like meatloaf. my mind just can’t get around that concept.
    my first intro. to grits was in a high school boarding school–8th grade. silly me. i tho’t it was a bowl of cream of wheat. what a shock. once i learned to eat them the right way–with butter and salt and pepper, they were pretty good. ha! m

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  8. Chelsea says:

    If you dabble in grits again, try putting the leftover plain grits in a loaf pan and refrigerating them until they are solid. Then you slice the grits (like meatloaf), fry them in a little butter, and serve them with real maple syrup for breakfast. Good stuff, maynard

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  9. Chelsea says:

    If you dabble in grits again, try putting the leftover plain grits in a loaf pan and refrigerating them until they are solid. Then you slice the grits (like meatloaf), fry them in a little butter, and serve them with real maple syrup for breakfast. Good stuff, maynard

    Like

  10. Suzanne says:

    Oh dear! I had better refrain from posting my original comment regarding grits. It appears there are quite a few grit lovers in your readership. I might get myself in trouble!

    Like

  11. Suzanne says:

    Oh dear! I had better refrain from posting my original comment regarding grits. It appears there are quite a few grit lovers in your readership. I might get myself in trouble!

    Like

  12. Gina says:

    My sweet friend. Who else could bring me moments of delight as she discovers the Joys of Grits, and ponders their salvation. (By the way, I’m sure they’ll be at the Great Feast, one day.)

    Like

  13. Gina says:

    My sweet friend. Who else could bring me moments of delight as she discovers the Joys of Grits, and ponders their salvation. (By the way, I’m sure they’ll be at the Great Feast, one day.)

    Like

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