Music Discussion: I’m Movin’ On by Rascal Flatts

We’re concluding our music discussion week with my pick. I really hope the country label didn’t scare you off. Though this is the last song posting, please feel free to go back to the other songs and throw your thoughts in over there again. And, of course, this one needs your attention as well. I know it’s been a lot for four days, but thanks, thanks, thanks for giving so much thought to these music selections.

Rascal Flatts: I’m Movin’ On
I’ve dealt with my ghosts and I’ve faced all my demons
Finally content with a past I regret
I’ve found you find strength in your moments of weakness
For once I’m at peace with myself
I’ve been burdened with blame, trapped in the past for too long
I’m movin’ on

I’ve lived in this place and I know all the faces
Each one is different but they’re always the same
They mean me no harm but it’s time that I face it
They’ll never allow me to change
But I never dreamed home would end up where I don’t belong
I’m movin’ on

I’m movin’ on
At last I can see life has been patiently waiting for me
And I know there’s no guarantees, but I’m not alone
There comes a time in everyone’s life
When all you can see are the years passing by
And I have made up my mind that those days are gone

I sold what I could and packed what I couldn’t
Stopped to fill up on my way out of town
I’ve loved like I should but lived like I shouldn’t
I had to lose everything to find out
Maybe forgiveness will find me somewhere down this road
I’m movin’ on
I’m movin’ on
I’m movin’ on

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23 thoughts on “Music Discussion: I’m Movin’ On by Rascal Flatts

  1. Megan says:

    Okay, so I can’t decide if the silence here is my punishment for asking you all to purchase a country song, or if the week is just too goofy to discuss 5 songs. Regardless, I’m going to attempt to begin a discussion…
    I’ve not been a life-long country music listener. I dabbled with the country stations in college when I was bored on the drive to and from school/home, but never really got into it. Then, I think it was about this time last year, I did the same thing between home and seminary – played with the radio dial and ended up on a country station. Yes, a lot of the songs are twangy and silly and cheesy. But the thing that drew me in to many of them was the storytelling.
    It is much easier to listen to a country song and “get” the song, because, from my listening experiences, country tends to be less about poetry and angst and more about actual storytelling and life experiences.
    So I guess instead of telling what you think this song means (because really, we all sort of know already), I’m wondering if you can identify with it at all? Does it speak to any of your life experiences? And can you get past the fact that a “popular” country artist is performing it?

    Like

  2. kateortiz says:

    i am not an avid country music listener, but i enjoyed this song. it tells a story and i always enjoy that in music.
    this song has been coming to my mind as i think about several conversations i’ve had recently. i’ve learned recently that there are several individuals in our church who have been at the church for a long time and have been involved in some fairly serious sin or heartbreaking life events. and they are still there, with many people knowing about their pasts. and they share what they’ve been through.
    “I’ve lived in this place and I know all the faces
    Each one is different but they’re always the same
    They mean me no harm but it’s time that I face it
    They’ll never allow me to change
    But I never dreamed home would end up where I don’t belong”
    it’s this verse that has particularly been coming to mind. i guess this song makes me realize how proud i am of the individuals and the congregation as a whole for living life next to each – through dark times and through restoration. it’s wonderful that they don’t feel like they have to move on.

    Like

  3. Jen says:

    This will be hard for me. I cannot abide country music. And I don’t like it for the reasons that it seems many of you do. The storytelling drives me nuts! Same reason I’m not a fan of Ray Boltz or Mark Schultz!

    Like

  4. Bethany says:

    For my part, I haven’t commented because it’s the only song of the 5 I wasn’t already quite familiar with. 🙂 In fact, I’ve never heard it, so it makes it hard to discuss.

    Like

  5. april b says:

    I’ve been here all week…not talking…just like class! But at last I can’t resist b/c a country song is involved. Megan, my story is the same as yours. I resisted the country genre for so long mainly b/c I am from GA where everyone who listens to country is, well…drives big trucks, wears black concert t-shirts, big belt buckles and cowboy boots (not that there is anything wrong with this fashion, its just not my style). But a few years ago after having my little heart broken by a mean boy, I feel in love with country music…and particularly Rascal Flats. You are right. Their songs are twangy and some may say, cheesy. However, you can’t deny that country songs are wonderful stories put to music. And many times I have found that musically (not that I am an expert) the quality of their voices is just as beautiful.
    Concerning this song in particular…I really liked it. I had not heard it before, but I really liked it. In regards to the same mean boy that broke my heart I still struggle at times to “move on” because my mind replays the messages over and over of things he said that hurt me. Since getting married I have been working through “the ghosts of my past” and trying to come to a place that I can say “I’m content with a past I regret…I’m movin’ on.”
    Thanks for the song choice…and thanks for the discussion all week. I have throughly enjoyed it. It was different to do it online rather than in person. But a cool twist.

    Like

  6. Claudia says:

    I have no idea who Ray Boltz and Mark Schultz even is….
    I think movin on- acceptance- is hard and we must go through many stages before we get there. I like that the song seems well seasoned and not trite.
    I think personally I have moved on in some areas of my story and not others. I’m not even sure what I haven’t moved on from, but know that I tend to be blind unless exposed. I am grateful that God will call me out of trees and not let me hide forever.

    Like

  7. Megan says:

    Okay, so I can’t decide if the silence here is my punishment for asking you all to purchase a country song, or if the week is just too goofy to discuss 5 songs. Regardless, I’m going to attempt to begin a discussion…
    I’ve not been a life-long country music listener. I dabbled with the country stations in college when I was bored on the drive to and from school/home, but never really got into it. Then, I think it was about this time last year, I did the same thing between home and seminary – played with the radio dial and ended up on a country station. Yes, a lot of the songs are twangy and silly and cheesy. But the thing that drew me in to many of them was the storytelling.
    It is much easier to listen to a country song and “get” the song, because, from my listening experiences, country tends to be less about poetry and angst and more about actual storytelling and life experiences.
    So I guess instead of telling what you think this song means (because really, we all sort of know already), I’m wondering if you can identify with it at all? Does it speak to any of your life experiences? And can you get past the fact that a “popular” country artist is performing it?

    Like

  8. kateortiz says:

    i am not an avid country music listener, but i enjoyed this song. it tells a story and i always enjoy that in music.
    this song has been coming to my mind as i think about several conversations i’ve had recently. i’ve learned recently that there are several individuals in our church who have been at the church for a long time and have been involved in some fairly serious sin or heartbreaking life events. and they are still there, with many people knowing about their pasts. and they share what they’ve been through.
    “I’ve lived in this place and I know all the faces
    Each one is different but they’re always the same
    They mean me no harm but it’s time that I face it
    They’ll never allow me to change
    But I never dreamed home would end up where I don’t belong”
    it’s this verse that has particularly been coming to mind. i guess this song makes me realize how proud i am of the individuals and the congregation as a whole for living life next to each – through dark times and through restoration. it’s wonderful that they don’t feel like they have to move on.

    Like

  9. Jen says:

    This will be hard for me. I cannot abide country music. And I don’t like it for the reasons that it seems many of you do. The storytelling drives me nuts! Same reason I’m not a fan of Ray Boltz or Mark Schultz!

    Like

  10. Bethany says:

    For my part, I haven’t commented because it’s the only song of the 5 I wasn’t already quite familiar with. 🙂 In fact, I’ve never heard it, so it makes it hard to discuss.

    Like

  11. Claudia says:

    I have no idea who Ray Boltz and Mark Schultz even is….
    I think movin on- acceptance- is hard and we must go through many stages before we get there. I like that the song seems well seasoned and not trite.
    I think personally I have moved on in some areas of my story and not others. I’m not even sure what I haven’t moved on from, but know that I tend to be blind unless exposed. I am grateful that God will call me out of trees and not let me hide forever.

    Like

  12. Jen says:

    Oh yes! If I never hear “thank you” again, it will be waaayyyyy too soon!! Must be a recovering baptist thing. I was raised baptist. Still baptistic in theology for the most part, but definitely “liberal” in my parents’ view.

    Like

  13. caron says:

    i would just like to say, for the record, that i love certain ray boltz songs. particularly this one called “he’s alive”. for the same reason i love that sandi patty song “was it a morning like this?”. wholeheartedly. those songs move me. but i ‘spose it’s the resurrection that stirs my emotion more than the artistry of the songwriter/singer.

    Like

  14. Melissa says:

    Dang… do you ever have those days where you are STRUGGLING and God keeps hitting at the issue in a number of different ways? This was one for me today – especially what you said, Claudia, about moving on and acceptance. Songs always pull me in, and although I’ve not heard this one, the line: “I’ve loved like I should and lived like I shouldn’t, I had to loose everything to find out” connected with me in present circumstances. Life is HARD, but God’s truth, however painful, is what I should be holding tightest to. Thanks for the encouragement. (Kate’s friend)

    Like

  15. Jen says:

    Oh yes! If I never hear “thank you” again, it will be waaayyyyy too soon!! Must be a recovering baptist thing. I was raised baptist. Still baptistic in theology for the most part, but definitely “liberal” in my parents’ view.

    Like

  16. caron says:

    i would just like to say, for the record, that i love certain ray boltz songs. particularly this one called “he’s alive”. for the same reason i love that sandi patty song “was it a morning like this?”. wholeheartedly. those songs move me. but i ‘spose it’s the resurrection that stirs my emotion more than the artistry of the songwriter/singer.

    Like

  17. Melissa says:

    Dang… do you ever have those days where you are STRUGGLING and God keeps hitting at the issue in a number of different ways? This was one for me today – especially what you said, Claudia, about moving on and acceptance. Songs always pull me in, and although I’ve not heard this one, the line: “I’ve loved like I should and lived like I shouldn’t, I had to loose everything to find out” connected with me in present circumstances. Life is HARD, but God’s truth, however painful, is what I should be holding tightest to. Thanks for the encouragement. (Kate’s friend)

    Like

  18. Jen says:

    Megan,
    Would you please e-mail me “off blog” at the e-mail address I left in the comments. I couldn’t find a contact address on your blog and I just have a question for you!
    Thanks!
    Jen

    Like

  19. Megan says:

    These lines right here:
    “I’ve lived in this place and I know all the faces
    Each one is different but they’re always the same
    They mean me no harm but it’s time that I face it
    They’ll never allow me to change
    But I never dreamed home would end up where I don’t belong”
    These are words that make me very close to crying every time I hear them. It so defines our time of transition. I’m not at all saying that the people we were with were not encouraging, life changing kinds of people, but the situation we were in was one that didn’t seem to be moving anywhere, nor using Craig according to his giftings to the best of his ability. And our church struggles were so intense in Colorado, I think we almost had to leave to find a place. And even in that, it has been a hard struggle here too, partly because of the past baggage we’ve (I’ve) brought with us – it has made it so hard to commit to a place.
    I’ve never dreamed home would end up where I don’t belong. I sort of feel that way now. This, this St. Louis, this church, this life we’re in right now – this is home. And I’m just now beginning to realize that and possibly to embrace it a bit.

    Like

  20. Jen says:

    Megan,
    Would you please e-mail me “off blog” at the e-mail address I left in the comments. I couldn’t find a contact address on your blog and I just have a question for you!
    Thanks!
    Jen

    Like

  21. Megan says:

    These lines right here:
    “I’ve lived in this place and I know all the faces
    Each one is different but they’re always the same
    They mean me no harm but it’s time that I face it
    They’ll never allow me to change
    But I never dreamed home would end up where I don’t belong”
    These are words that make me very close to crying every time I hear them. It so defines our time of transition. I’m not at all saying that the people we were with were not encouraging, life changing kinds of people, but the situation we were in was one that didn’t seem to be moving anywhere, nor using Craig according to his giftings to the best of his ability. And our church struggles were so intense in Colorado, I think we almost had to leave to find a place. And even in that, it has been a hard struggle here too, partly because of the past baggage we’ve (I’ve) brought with us – it has made it so hard to commit to a place.
    I’ve never dreamed home would end up where I don’t belong. I sort of feel that way now. This, this St. Louis, this church, this life we’re in right now – this is home. And I’m just now beginning to realize that and possibly to embrace it a bit.

    Like

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